• Weed and more native plants will come

    by  • May 16, 2012 • Design, Garden, Plant Profiles, Sierra Foothills, Spring

    Field of Pretty Face

    Field of Pretty Face

    The natural meadow in the second year
    By that, I mean, this is the second year that I have weeded or planted here.

    I’ve planted my 5 year old garden in irrigation zones.  The area around the house gets the most water and has the most non-native, but Mediterranean plants. We’re on a slope so the next level down is also a mix, but the plants there live without much water at all once established.

    The outlying areas in a large circle around this level is wild, but with some introduced California native plants and will get no water after this second year.

    In the center is where the wildflower transplants were installed.

    In the center is where the wildflower transplants were installed.

    One area of this third, no-water area just below the house, I call the natural meadow because it started out with many existing native wildflowers like Blue flax, linum lewisii, Valley Tassels, Castilleja attenuata, Pretty face, Blue flax, linum lewisii, Valley Tassels, Castilleja attenuata, Pretty face, Triteleia ixioides and Shooting star, Dodecatheon hendersonii, Dodecatheon hendersonii.  It’s in a large open gently sloping field with an old glider bench overlooking.

    Old glider on path between the 'zones'

    Old glider on path between the ‘zones’

    In the center of this area, last spring, I transplanted some wintersown wildflowers from six-pak trays into the ground.

    The flowers are incredibly more dense than last year

    The flowers are incredibly more dense than last year

    For three days that same spring I weeded the whole 30′ x 80′ area and now, a year later, I see the result even more natives have grown here.  I’m delighted!  With a few manageable patches of the filaree weeded this month, the meadow glows with the soft yellow of the Pretty face.

    See the tiny grass in between? Achnatherum hymenoides, Indian ricegrass

    See the tiny grass in between? It’s Indian ricegrass, Achnatherum hymenoides

    About

    Sue Langley, a passionate gardener and photographer lives and gardens with her husband and Corgi, Maggie on 7 acres just south of Yosemite, Zone 7 at 3000 feet. She also manages the Flea Market Gardening Facebook page and website.