• Lewis Creek: The Wildflowers

    by  • June 1, 2011 • Field Trip, Sierra Foothills, Spring • 14 Comments

    Lewis Creek is about 7 miles south of Yosemite National Park, CA. The trail all along it with the flowers,waterfalls and natural beauty are a lovely alternative to visiting the Park if you have limited time, or if you want to avoid crowds, or if the roads are snowy in the Spring. I described the trail and the swarms of ladybugs in Part One.

    Lewis Creek Trail Part Two: The Wildflowers

    Sierra’s Call
    by Clifford Corlieu

    Give me the mountains,
    The glorious mountains,
    Whose beauties all come from the snows,
    Where nature’s hand blesses
    The soul with caresses
    Of free life and quiet repose…

    The wildflowers of Lewis Creek

    Walking the Lewis Creek Trail at the end of May is heaven for the wildflower lover. On my first visit, I didn’t know any of the true names and had only begun to be interested in natives in my own garden. Now as I look at these photos, I recognize a few, have looked up a few and enjoy seeing them all.

    The trail is beautiful and mossy green, the walk is easy and about 3 miles round trip, the distance I used to walk every day when I lived in the suburbs. A cloudy-bright day in Spring, preferably after a rain, is the best time to go.

    Two beautiful waterfalls are at either end of the trail, Corlieu Fall, named after a local rancher and poet, and Red Rock Fall upstream. In between, along this trail, are the flowers. Come see…

     

    Hartweg's Iris, Iris hartwegii

    Hartweg’s Iris, Iris hartwegii

    Western brackenfern, Pteridium aquilinum

    Western brackenfern, Pteridium aquilinum

    Asarum hartwegii, Hartweg's Wild Ginger

    Asarum hartwegii, Hartweg’s Wild Ginger

    California Indian Pink, Silene californica

    California Indian Pink, Silene californica

    Checker Lily, Fritillaria affinis var. affinis

    Checker Lily, Fritillaria affinis var. affinis

    California Strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    California Strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    The trail closely follows the creek the whole way offering views like this through the trees.

    False Solomon's seal, Smilacina stellata

    False Solomon’s seal, Smilacina stellata

    Pacific bleeding heart, Dicentra formosa

    Pacific bleeding heart, Dicentra formosa

     

    Lewis Creek pond

    Lewis Creek pond

     

    Sticky Cinquefoil, Potentilla glandulosa

    Sticky Cinquefoil, Potentilla glandulosa

    Unknown..can someone ID this?

    Unknown..can someone ID this?

     

    Lewis Creek moss rock

    Lewis Creek moss rock

     

    Lewis Creek mossy stump

    Lewis Creek mossy stump

     

    Lewis Creek Trail heads under a tree

    Lewis Creek Trail heads under a tree

     

    Western Wallflower, Erysimum capitatum

    Western Wallflower, Erysimum capitatum

     

    Western Azalea, Rhododendron occidentale

    Western Azalea, Rhododendron occidentale

     

    Mossy pine and Pacific dogwood, Cornus nuttallii

    Mossy pine roots and Pacific dogwood, Cornus nuttallii

    This dogwood seems to form an airy halo around the sturdy roots of the pine.

    Part 1  Lewis Creek: Converging Ladybugs converge

    The trail. And, I come upon swarms of ladybugs and find out all about them and their travels from here to the Central Valley and back

    About

    Sue Langley, a passionate gardener and photographer lives and gardens with her husband and Corgi, Maggie on 7 acres just south of Yosemite, Zone 7 at 3000 feet. She also manages the Flea Market Gardening Facebook page and website.

    14 Responses to Lewis Creek: The Wildflowers

    1. June 1, 2011 at 10:02 am

      What a wonderful continuation of this stunning walk, Sue! I am wild about the mossy rocks, mossy stumps and mossy roots! I am unable to even hazard a guess at the plant you need identified 😉 Those ferns and brackens are so beautiful and I could almost smell the damp, dank earth beneath the layer of pine needles. I love how the azaleas are growing wild. I always associate them with cultivation 😉 Anywhere where there are trees, winding paths, lots of cooling water and the sound of birds is my idea of heaven 🙂 And I love walking beneath fallen trunks and across rustic bridges. This walk had all those elements…thank you!

    2. June 1, 2011 at 11:46 am

      The Iris harwegii is just beautiful, I don’t think I’ve seen one before, the color is quite striking. It’s interesting seeing the Fritillaria and Solomon’s Seal now, as ours finished blooming a few weeks ago here. Always fun to compare though, and those roots on the pine are just wonderful. I love the appearance of tree roots like that, they almost don’t look real!

    3. June 1, 2011 at 2:16 pm

      hi, i was excited to read your post today because we are planning a trip to california right now! this looks like another beautiful place to consider…i am glad to know about it. your unidentified plant looks like bedstraw of some sort to me. (Galium sp.)

    4. June 1, 2011 at 2:16 pm

      hi, i was excited to read your post today because we are planning a trip to california right now! this looks like another beautiful place to consider…i am glad to know about it. your unidentified plant looks like bedstraw of some sort to me. (Galium sp.)

    5. June 1, 2011 at 7:58 pm

      Isn’t it wonderful to go hiking and find old friends from the garden in the woods? Or to come home from a hike and find the same precious flowers in the garden? For me, that’s one of the best things about native plant gardening… Great plants.

    6. June 1, 2011 at 7:58 pm

      Isn’t it wonderful to go hiking and find old friends from the garden in the woods? Or to come home from a hike and find the same precious flowers in the garden? For me, that’s one of the best things about native plant gardening… Great plants.

    7. June 5, 2011 at 9:42 pm

      I love the mossy stump. Just looking at the photos makes me feel cooler and calmer, like I’ve just walked into a moist, shady forest. You’ve taken some great shots that give a wonderful sense of place, and the photo with the cinquefoil is extra-nice!

    8. June 6, 2011 at 7:58 am

      Thanks you all, Desiree, we have a 100 mile scenic loop starting from our little town where we go every year to see more of this scenery as summer goes on. The Hartweg Iris, I also love, Clare. This trail is about 3500 ft and we’ve found that spring lingers nicely in the higher country, even more so when you go higher to 6000-7000 ft towards Mammoth Pools. Daricia, I hope you have a wonderful trip! Hmm, I’ll have to check Galium…I’ve been pulling that out of my fields and meadows all spring. Even though it’s native, it’s a weed to me.

      I love seeing the flowers and plants here and in our surrounding area, Town Mouse. We take our dog for long walks and a trail like this is exceptionally beautiful! Thanks, James for your kind comments and for pointing out the cinquefoil. The two captions got glued together and one photo went into the Twilight Zone. Fixed! Now, what is that unidentified plant, folks? I guess I could send it to Dave’s Garden Plant ID forum…hahaha

    9. June 6, 2011 at 5:57 pm

      Pure magic!

    10. June 6, 2011 at 5:57 pm

      Pure magic!

    11. Justin
      August 29, 2012 at 8:21 am

      Dear Sue Langley:

      I’m writing to ask permission to reprint a graphic from your blog
      depicting potentilla glandulosa in a slide for our course. This course,
      called Introduction to Genetics and Evolution will be offered in the
      open, online course environment Coursera
      (https://www.coursera.org/course/geneticsevolution). The lectures,
      including those containing the picture in question, will be available
      only to registered students, but registration will be open to all.
      These courses are free for any student, and my use of this picture
      will be entirely educational, incorporated into the lecture. No
      profit will be generated by the use or the course. I’m happy to give
      attribution to the source of the graphic, too, but please clarify for
      me if this picture was taken by you (in which case I’d cite your website).

      If you are able to grant permission I will be very grateful. Since
      this is a non-profit educational use, we hope you can waive any
      licensing fees.

      If you could let me know as soon as possible, that’d be great, so we
      can begin to record the associated lecture segments.

      Thanks for considering it! — Justin

      • August 29, 2012 at 8:41 am

        Absolutely,…My page is copyright-free. I’m glad you can use the image…yes, taken by me. Sue

    12. Justin
      August 29, 2012 at 8:21 am

      Dear Sue Langley:

      I’m writing to ask permission to reprint a graphic from your blog
      depicting potentilla glandulosa in a slide for our course. This course,
      called Introduction to Genetics and Evolution will be offered in the
      open, online course environment Coursera
      (https://www.coursera.org/course/geneticsevolution). The lectures,
      including those containing the picture in question, will be available
      only to registered students, but registration will be open to all.
      These courses are free for any student, and my use of this picture
      will be entirely educational, incorporated into the lecture. No
      profit will be generated by the use or the course. I’m happy to give
      attribution to the source of the graphic, too, but please clarify for
      me if this picture was taken by you (in which case I’d cite your website).

      If you are able to grant permission I will be very grateful. Since
      this is a non-profit educational use, we hope you can waive any
      licensing fees.

      If you could let me know as soon as possible, that’d be great, so we
      can begin to record the associated lecture segments.

      Thanks for considering it! — Justin

    13. April 6, 2016 at 11:36 am

      Loved your photos!

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