• wordless wildish wednesday

    by  • March 30, 2011 • Plant Profiles, Spring, wordless • 13 Comments

    Blue Flax, linum lewisii, a CA native, introduced in my garden

    Blue Flax, linum lewisii, a CA native, introduced in my garden

     

    Blue Flax, linum lewisii, not native to my property, but wildish

    Blue Flax, linum lewisii, not native to my property, but wildish

     

    Blue Flax in the meadow

    Blue Flax in the meadow

     

    Blue Flax in the meadow. See sky lupine, orange wallflower, a Rose Globe Lily and Mule ears seedlings

    Blue Flax in the meadow. See also, sky lupine, orange wallflower, a Rose Globe Lily and Mule ears seedlings at the right

    Flax, a perennial, by the side entry in 2009

    Flax, a perennial, by the side entry in 2009

     

    Artlessly growing through an iron ring

    Artlessly growing through an iron ring

     

    Flax by the side entry in 2010. Plant Flax!

    Flax by the side entry in 2010. Plant Flax!

    Linum lewisii

    About

    Sue Langley, a passionate gardener and photographer lives and gardens with her husband and Corgi, Maggie on 7 acres just south of Yosemite, Zone 7 at 3000 feet. She also manages the Flea Market Gardening Facebook page and website.

    13 Responses to wordless wildish wednesday

    1. March 30, 2011 at 4:08 pm

      beautiful, the wild flowers have a wonderful delicacy about them which I love, Frances

    2. March 30, 2011 at 8:59 pm

      That color is just out of this world, and your photos capture it well. Now, where did you get the mule’s ear?

    3. March 30, 2011 at 9:04 pm

      Like the meadow. And the flax.

    4. March 30, 2011 at 9:05 pm

      I love this plant. Mine haven’t started blooming yet this year, but I’m sure they will.

    5. March 30, 2011 at 9:32 pm

      Frances, I wonder if you could grow this from seed. I know you love blue. The flowers continue for a long time, blooming from the bottom, up the stems.

      Hi TownMouse, I love blue, too, this is pretty true blue, huh? The Hall’s Mule Ears, Wyethia elata, grow in patches all through the hills here. They’re fabulous natives and I’ve learned not to water them at all.

      Thanks, Kerry, they’d go in your field, too, I think. I got the seeds from Wildseed farms in a mix. They’ve remained after all others have disappeared.

      Gayle, I love them, too! They bloom in April and May, haven’t started yet, but the new growth is coming out of the old wood. The stems remain from year to year and get cut back like lavender, say; the foliage looks like breath of heaven, very soft and ferny.

    6. March 30, 2011 at 9:51 pm

      Interesting concept…the “wildish-flower meadow”… The little touches of sky blue brought down to the earth are wonderful.

    7. March 30, 2011 at 11:44 pm

      What a nice looking meadow! Wyethia is one of my favorites, but it’s so seldom found in nurseries. Perhaps it’s too easily propagated from wild-harvested seed? Down here Wyethia ovata is my species of choice, but it seems to be scarce on the ground. Of course I said the same about Venegasia carpesiodes then found the mother lode at a plant sale. I think these obscure-in-the-trade plants get grown out every few years, but if it’s not a year for it then good luck finding some.

    8. March 31, 2011 at 3:00 pm

      Wow, that flax is gorgeous. I’ve never tried to grow it before. It’s a beauty;-)

    9. April 1, 2011 at 4:48 pm

      Thanks, James, I thought since I introduced it to my garden but it’s a CA native, then wild-ish would be a good wordlees for this Wednesday

      Thanks, Brett, I don’t think I’ve ever seen Wytheia in the nursery. I never heard of it before moving to the mountains and it took me awhile to positively ID it. I’m still learning more every year about natives.

      Thanks, Jan and welcome! There is another flax, native to North America, Linum perenne, that many people like very much, also a Scarlet flax and a yellow one, called Rock Flax.

    10. April 3, 2011 at 7:11 am

      Hi Sue!

      I really fell behind this past week and it has taken quite some doing to get round and visits all the posts I’d missed.

      This little flower is just so absolutely charming…to start with, my favourite colour in the garden, and it’s so dainty and prolific. I’d not seen them before and am wondering whether they’d grow here as I would love to have them in my garden, too!

      Your pictures are truly breath-taking!

    11. April 4, 2011 at 10:44 am

      Plant flax indeed. It’s one of my favorites, though I admit I haven’t been using it much lately. The fifty or so that were in our yard are down to a half dozen plus a lot of volunteers that can’t seem to outpace the snail damage. This post makes me want more of them again.

    12. April 5, 2011 at 11:28 pm

      Hi Sue – Lovely blog – love all the pics (especially this beautiful flax). I am originally from Michigan and noticed in one of your other posts you have relatives in Michigan. I’m in San Diego County now – how about you?

    13. April 6, 2011 at 6:40 am

      Thanks, Desiree! I planted this from seed, but a few behave like perennials near the house. I see the foliage all year although in the winter if is brown. When I see the new growth, now, I cut it back and it takes off again.

      Hi Ryan, thanks! I don’t think I could handle both deer and snails, but it’s seems too cold for snails here. I used to go out each morning before work to squash snails with half a brick I kept for that purpose. Every morning! Until one morning I got a squirt of snail juice in the eye…I stopped then.

      Sherry, thanks and welcome! I was born and raised in OC, but our rellys came from the IL and MI and moved West in the 1920’s because of the weather!

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