• Mysteries in the mulch

    by  • December 13, 2010 • Fall, Plant Profiles

    Get down…

    Get down low…and see the mysteries that may be in your mulch and layer of leaf liter under the trees..

    Carpet of creeping thyme

    Carpet of creeping thyme

    The ground is wet and I’m careful where I walk, so not to, literally, slip on the slopes. The mountain above my garden commands attention, frosted in snow or shrouded with cloud, ever changing now. But, today,…I’m looking down.

     

    Creeping woodsorrel, Oxalis corniculata

    Creeping woodsorrel, Oxalis corniculata

     

    Among the clover, a star shaped plant(what) with pink blossoms, so tiny

    Among the clover, a star shaped plant, called Baby Stars will have pink pink blossoms soon, so tiny

    Looking down, though, to watch my step, I see mostly mulch covering the paths and beds. The colors of the Fall garden have melted into it and the muted tones of pine green, the grey-green of the manzanita and the dull green of the deerbrush have the chance to distinguish themselves.

     

    Barely seen Pocket Mouse

    Barely seen Pocket Mouse

    Getting down low reveals more than just mulch. Some objects I know, some not, some lucky to see, some, like the Pretty face, I look forward to see. All are small mysteries.  And wonders.

     

    Huge Western Giant Puffball 6 inches around, a Calvatia booniana

    Huge Western Giant Puffball 6 inches around, a Calvatia booniana

     

    Persicaria capitata, a Knotweed variety and a pretty one

    Persicaria capitata, a Knotweed variety and a pretty one

     

    Commonly seen mushrooms (unidentified) pushing through

    Commonly seen mushrooms, probably Agaricus albolutescens, pushing through the mulch and wet earth

     

    Trametes versicolor; Turkey Tail Fungi

    Trametes versicolor, pretty Turkey Tail Fungi growing on some log steps

    About

    Sue Langley, a passionate gardener and photographer lives and gardens with her husband and Corgi, Maggie on 7 acres just south of Yosemite, Zone 7 at 3000 feet. She also manages the Flea Market Gardening Facebook page and website.