• Design in Nature

    by  • October 7, 2010 • Fall • 7 Comments

    In art school, we had an assignment on ‘Design in Nature’, and that, I think, inspired my love of patterns found in plants and close-up photos of nature in general.  I bought three macro filters…as macro lenses were too expensive for my Minolta SRT 101 single lens reflex camera I had saved for when I was a teen.  Here are some recent photos found in the garden this month:

    Artemisa 'Powis Castle' and Red fountain grass

    Artemisa ‘Powis Castle’ and Red fountain grass

     

    Brachycome and Mullein

    Brachycome and Mullein

     

    Common Mullein Verbascum thapsus

    Common Mullein Verbascum thapsus

     

    Donkeytail spurge, Euphorbia myrsinites

    Donkeytail spurge, Euphorbia myrsinites

     

    Ajuga and Woolly sage

    Ajuga and Woolly sage

     

    Ajuga and Woolly sage

    Ajuga and Woolly sage

    I love the way the ajuga looks next to the thyme like a needlepoint pattern.

    Ajuga, Brachycome, Mullein and Woolly sage

    Ajuga, Brachycome, Mullein and Woolly sage

    That big leafed mullein just volunteered itself there. Nice, but I won’t let it seed there. 😀

    Hens and chicks, Dudlya cymosa

    Hens and chicks, Dudlya cymosa

    I promise myself to do more of these macros. It’s fun!

    About

    Sue Langley, a passionate gardener and photographer lives and gardens with her husband and Corgi, Maggie on 7 acres just south of Yosemite, Zone 7 at 3000 feet. She also manages the Flea Market Gardening Facebook page and website.

    7 Responses to Design in Nature

    1. October 7, 2010 at 7:39 pm

      Love that fuzzy photo of the Verbascum! There’s so much to see…

      • October 13, 2010 at 9:49 am

        I love your blog, Mouse! Thanks! I still have to get my blog roll going….once I found out what it was!! 🙂

    2. October 8, 2010 at 11:29 pm

      I’m still saving for a macro lens for my Canon and I bought it 18 months ago. It’s actually pretty funny because lots of less expensive point and shoot cameras do macro shots automatically. Maybe after I get through the instruction book (if that day ever comes) I’ll treat myself to a macro lens. It couldn’t hurt the quality of my blog, that’s for sure.

      Christine in Alaska

      • October 13, 2010 at 9:51 am

        It’s worth it, Christine, if you really enjoy close up photography. These types of photos are fascinating because they give you a view not many see. I love it!

    3. October 9, 2010 at 9:04 am

      That Artemisa and Red fountain grass look grate together!

      • October 13, 2010 at 10:04 am

        Hi Sunny, Thanks! I took a look at your latest post on the stone river. Wonderful work!

    4. October 13, 2010 at 10:08 am

      Thanks, Bom. Nice to hear from you so far away! I see you have a post on macro, too! Neat.

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